• Electronics, Programming 16.05.2013

    Years of disassembling old printers and scanners yielded a lot of stepper motors which lay unused in a drawer for a long time. This was the inspiration to design a small and easy to use interface for a stepper motor. The first idea was to use the standard combination of the L293 motor controller and the L297 full bridge driver, but those chips take up a lot of space and do not provide microstepping functionality. A better option is an integrated stepper motor controller, like the Allegro A3984, which includes a microstep sequencer and the MOSFET bridge in a very small package. It can drive motors with up to 35V and 2.5A, which is enough for most small and medium stepper motors, especially those harvested from printers.

    To provide an easy interface, the motor should be controllable from the PC. This leaves an RS232 or an USB interface to connect to a microcontroller which in turn connects to the stepper motor driver. While there exists a (very good) software USB stack for the AVR microcontrollers, I chose the LPC11U24. After having worked with LPC microcontrollers at my job a lot, I was already familiar with the LPC11C24 and the lpcXpresso IDE.

    The LPC11U24 has an integrated hardware USB interface and a built-in USB bootloader which shows up as an mass storage device to the computer. Flashing a new firmware is as easy as dragging the binary file to the USB driver!

    Additional to controlling the motor via USB I wanted some methods of direct input on the motor. For that reason I added three buttons and a potentiometer on the circuit board. To connect limit or reference switches, some pinheaders are included. Three LEDs provide feedback from the LPC.
    As one motor is seldom enough to do something interesting, a way of connecting several motors together. My solution to this problem was to add a CAN-bus interface using the MCP2515 CAN controller and the MCP2551 CAN transceiver. The MCP2515 is connected to the LPC via SPI. The CAN bus and power connections (5V and motor power) are available on pin headers on each side of the PCB to make the controllers cascadeable.
    The A3984 provides an input for a reference voltage to control the motor current. An 10bit DAC (MCP4716) was added and connected to the LPC via I²C.
    The circuit board was designed to fit on the back of a NEMA17 (42x42mm) stepper motor.

    USB Stepper Motor Driver

    USB Stepper Motor Driver

    As of yet the USB communication is basically working and the motor is turning. The microstepping works quite well and the motor runs very fast and smooth. I have already implemented velocity ramping but apparently still have some calculation errors as the positioning is not exact. Software modules for reading the potentiometer and the buttons are completed, too. Sending and receiving CAN message is also working. The next step is to make the controllers talk to each other and to enable the master to discover other attached motors. After that the USB communcation has to be improved. In the end, the master should store a sequence of motion commands (maybe G-Code?) and control all attached motors.

    As a first test I used the motor to wind a coil for an electromagnet. I wrote a litte delphi program that sends commands via USB and constructed a frame from lasercut plexiglass to hold the bobbin.

    USB Stepper Motor Control Software

    USB Stepper Motor Control Software

    Coil Winding with Stepper Motor

    Coil Winding with Stepper Motor

    When the project is a little more advanced, I will publish the circuit board layout and the full source code for the firmware and the control software.

    Posted by Konstantin @ 01:45

    Tags: , , , , ,

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


    *